Overview

Homeschoolers: Who They Are?
At the most basic level, homeschooling describes a method of home-based education lead by one or both parents. However, Homeschool.com notes that home-based education may take many different forms: some homeschoolers incorporate a mixture of home-based and institutional education, sometime team-teach with other families, charter schools are sometimes classified as homeschooling, some homeschoolers use independent-study programs while others depend on supplementary materials. Furthermore, some homeschoolers have a very structured routine (mimicking institutional routines), while others prefer an unstructured education (sometimes referred to as child-lead instruction). Many mix elements of structured and unstructured education. Also, despite a few common statistics and the stereotypes, “Homeschoolers are everywhere…come from all walks of life,” and can be found in every population (www.homeschool.com/new/faq.asp).

However, libraries located in certain areas may be more likely to encounter homeschoolers. Adrienne Furness, in her book Helping Homeschoolers in the Library, lists a few common statistics: more homeschoolers live in urban as opposed to rural communities, many have at least a bachelor’s degree, and many are two-parent households where one parents stays home to educate the children. There are also some common characteristics regarding why many homeschoolers choose this education method: school environment concerns, quality of the education in the area schools, religious/moral concerns, and having special-needs children (Furness, p. 4). This said, Furness goes on to include a number of chapters specific to the needs and wants of homeschoolers from a variety of population groups including various races, religions, and a variety of special needs kids, including physical, mental, emotional, and learning disabled. Since homeschoolers are such a diverse community, is it important not to stereotype the homeschoolers that use your library.


Why Do Parents Choose to Homeschool?

While many parents base their decision to homeshool on their own personal experiences with education, it is more often a combination of factors that ultimately lead to the removal of children from tradition education formats. Religion often plays a part, but equally what parents perceive as a gap in traditional education forms the crux of their reasoning. Ultimately, parents feel as though “their children’s unique academic, behavioral, emotional, or physical needs” are not being met in schools and the supplemental education in the home can fulfill that need (Green 271).


Parental Needs

For parents to be able to provide comparable, if not superior education to their children and students, they must either have an established background in the subjects they personally seek to teach or access to resources that will round out what education they can provide. Many public institutions passively fill that role by providing such resources as local museums do in regards to elements of history and cultural evolution. The library, on the other hand, plays a much more active role and has the platform and opportunity to provide curriculum and supplemental materials to parents in a variety of subject areas. In many cases, the library is the primary source of educational material for parents. It can get incredibly expensive to purchase new curriculum materials each year as a child develops where the library can offer them for free. Even if these materials are restricted to reference materials, they are always available to the more flexible schedule of homeschool programming.


Implication of Providing for Homeschool Patron Families

By establishing a positive rapport with homeschooled patrons during their formative educational years, these patrons in turn become lifelong library users who give back to the library either with voluntary service or financial support. This should not be the main reason behind cultivating collections for homeschool use, but nonetheless can be considered. All patrons are a high risk investment but the returns on the investment in homeschooling families in the community can be great.
Additionally, it does not always cost more to provide specific programming for homeschooled patrons. Some libraries have encouraged their homeschooled patron groups to promote preregistration and suggested donations for certain programs in an effort to make them more sustainable for future homeschooled children as well as the libray (Marquam 15). By encouraging self-determined importance in the provided resources, those who utilize them most will become more invested in maintaining the funding for their provision. In this way both the library and the patrons benefit with no true loss to either party.


Why the Negative Stereotypes
Homeschool.com notes that the two leading stereotypes attached to homeschoolers are hippies and/or religious fanatics (www.homeschool.com/new/faq.asp). Furness lists a few additional concerns/stereotypes that non-homeschoolers often associate with homeschooled children: lack of socialization, insufficiently educated, and overly sheltered within the home environment. Furness notes that many of these negative stereotypes stem from the history of homeschooling. Even though the concept of homeschooling is not a modern idea, the official movement (in the United States) started alongside the hippie movement of the 1960s and then was adopted by far right, conservative Christians in the 1970s. Many of the earliest homeschoolers chose this method of education as a means of rebelling against compulsory education laws, in much the same way that various religious sectors start private, religious schools. However, many of these early homeschoolers were operating illegally. Homeschooling started to gain wider popularity among a far more diverse population in the 1990s, about the same time it became legal in all fifty states (Furness, p. 1). The U.S. Department of Education estimated the number of homeschooled children in 2007 to be approximately 1.5 million (http://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/d11/tables/dt11_003.asp).


Religion
While stereotypically, religious homeschoolers were assumed to be extreme conservatives, usually of the Protestant variety, homeschoolers come from a wide variety of faiths. Just a few of the other faiths, listed by Furness, include Catholic, Jewish, Jehovah’s Witness, Mormons, Quakers, Buddhists, Hindus, Muslims, and even Pagans. Many of these homeschoolers have a list of needs and concerns unique to their religious faith. For instance, Furness states that Pagans may have a special interest in books about nature, especially materials about local plants varieties. Jewish homeschoolers are more likely to use an unschooling or eclectic method. Catholics may prefer a Catholic curriculum (there are many different Catholic curriculum available). Many Catholics may also be interested in connecting with the organization Traditions of Roman Catholic Homes (T.O.R.C.H.), the largest organization for catholic homeschoolers (Furness). While many of these religious homeschoolers may have done their own research and already designed their own curriculums or joined organizations that fulfill their needs, some may also come to the library in search of for information or supplementary materials.


The Laws
Due to the recent nature of legalized homeschooling and the differences in laws from state to state, new homeschoolers may have lots of questions about the laws governing homeschool in their current state of residence or, if they are planning to move, their new state's rules of education. The Home School Legal Defense Association (HSLDA) is a good starting place for anyone looking for state-specific laws regarding homeschooling. HSLDA is a nonprofit organization and lobbying group that focuses on homeschoolers’ legal rights. However, Furness notes that the association is based in the conservative Protestant tradition and thus is not supported by all homeschoolers (p. 4). Still, HSLDA provides useful resources about state laws with individual pages that include links to education standards, laws, court cases, and more. Some states have very strict laws; others impose few if any restrictions on homeschooling.

Some of the broad variances in state regulations cited by HSLDA include:
  • 41 states require no specific qualifications for parents to education their children at home.
  • 9 states, (Georgia, North Carolina, North Dakota, New Mexico, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia) require that parents have either a high school diploma or a GED to home school.
  • Almost half of the U.S. (24 states) require some form of evaluation from a qualified individual or institution.
  • 11 states (Arkansas, Georgia, Hawaii, Minnesota, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Tennessee, and New York) require standardized testing in select grades.
  • 10 states (Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri, Oklahoma, Texas, Idaho, Alaska, Connecticut, New Jersey) have no registration requirements for homeschoolers.

A quicker method of acquiring specific state regulations may be to look on the websites of any homeschooling organizations or associations that serve your own state or city. Maureen T. Lerch and Janet Welch in their book Serving Homeschooled Teens and Their Parents include a listing of all the state organizations.

Other helpful websites containing legal information include:
National Homeschool Education Network http://www.nhen.org/legal/legal-information.html
Homeschool Diner http://homeschooldiner.com/basics/getting_started/legalities.html

Homeschoolers vs. Unschoolers
There are actually two different terms associated with home-educators, which describe slightly different home education philosophies: homeschoolers and unschoolers. The most obvious difference between the homeschool and the unschool approach is curriculum. The Homeschool Diner lists several different curriculum approaches frequently adopted by homeschoolers: School-at-Home, Alternative, and Eclectic. Homeschoolers who use the School-at-Home approach tend to buy a prepackaged curriculum and follow a strict schedule that is very similar to that of institutionalized schools. Alternative homeschoolers choose to educate according to a specific philosophy, such as the Classical or the Charlotte Mason philosophy, and may either buy a prepackaged program that uses this philosophy or put together their own program following this philosophy. The Eclectic curriculum approach describes the “mix-and-match” method of creating your own curriculum from scratch. In contrast, unschoolers tend to abandon the curriculum approach altogether. This philosophy promotes learning from everyday life and is sometimes even referred to as the “Life as a Curriculum” approach (Homeschool Diner, Curriculum Page).

The philosophy of unschooling began with John Holt. Furness describes how Holt’s books, How Children Fail and How Children Learn, depict a method of education driven by the child and not the parent or some educational institution. This method of schooling also incorporates the whole-world-as-a-classroom ideology. Furness’ examples of this include education that incorporates household objects such as “measuring cups, magnets, shovels, plants, [and] animals” as well as educational tools and toys such as “books, blocks, [and] Lego,” in addition to equipment such as “binoculars, magnifying glasses, prisms, microscopes, [and] telescopes,” and many more materials of interest (p. 14). Unschoolers may purchase these items themselves or visit area facilities, such as a library or children’s museum. Unschoolers prefer the hands-on approach to learning and Lerch and Welch note that this educational philosophy also embodies the notion that children should be allowed to learn at their own pace, in a way that is best suited to their individual learning styles, while focusing on their interests (p. 2). It is important to note that Holt did not assume that unschoolers will never use curricular resources and many unschooled children may decide to pick up a math or vocabulary book at some point. Furness notes that Holt’s theory centered on the idea that real-world experiences would provoke interest in specific academic subjects, and once interested, children would actively seek out further knowledge (p. 11).

Special Needs
Special needs include a large range of potential physical and mental issues. Furness actually goes so far as to include health issues (such as children on the organ transplant list), and giftedness, as well as developmental problems, learning disabilities, and emotional problems (p. 33). Obviously, many of the resources a library might provide to assist this population are already likely to have been considered, provided the library has made provisions for people with disabilities and handicaps. There are also a variety of websites available for these homeschoolers as well, and librarians might consider guiding patrons to some of them.

Blogs/Websites that Bring Homeschoolers into Libraries

  • How to Use the Library in Your Homeschool
    • An insightful list of reasons to make use of your local library for homeschooling purposes. It proposes that using the library with homeschool can save money on reference materials, bring together community resources, and provide technologies that may not be available in all households.
  • Library Services for Homeschoolers
    • A wiki compiled by Janine Weston, who shares her research from taking classes toward her MLIS at San Jose State University’s School of Library and Information Science. The best part is probably her collection of specific blog posts/articles to check out, which encompasses many of the aspects homeschooling deals with on a daily basis.
  • Back to Homeschooling at the Library
    • A patron of the New York Public Library posts personal anecdotes about her use of library resources for her homeschool; however, it also takes time to directly answer some frequently asked questions in a more personal way. This post is from the start of the most recent school year (Sept. 2012), and describes some specific materials to get started homeschooling your own child(ren).
  • Happy Hearts Homeschooling Library
    • This is a collection of free online vintage homeschool books and curricula. It works together with Project Gutenberg and Google Books. This site is probably of more interest to people researching the history of homeschooling and what was taught in earlier years.
  • Homeschoolers @ the Library
    • This blog is hosted by the Mid-Continent Public Library and focuses on the monthly topic and weekly programs that are specifically built for the homeschooling community at each of the many branches. The website also provides links to other helpful ideas and resources that the library makes available.
  • Why do they call this homeschooling?
    • The Houston County Public Library of Georgia asks the question 'Why do they call this homeschooling?' mostly as an opening to discuss all the great resources and programs that this library has available. Its lighthearted approach serves to lay out the technological components of homeschooling and how the library can help provide those.

Collection Development

Homeschoolers in the Library: Where to Start?
All these various types of homeschoolers may seem overwhelming. How does one serve such a diverse population? Where do you start? Furness notes that it is always a good idea first to ask homeschoolers what they want. Furness suggests indentifying local homeschooling organizations and/or groups, a task which may be as easy as typing your search into Google. If Google comes up empty, many homeschool resources sites (and the HSLDA site) also include listings of homeschool groups. Organizations that also may have homeschool contacts include local YMCAs, 4-H clubs, and even the boy and girl scouts (Furness, p. 55). A very good place to start planning your collection is Furness' consolidated list of the top 10 ways to help homeschoolers in the library.

Tips for Providing Quality Services for Homeschoolers

Top 10 Ways to Help Homeschoolers in the Library
Ten important things libraries can do to better serve homeschoolers from her PowerPoint presentation, Helping Homeschoolers in the Library, Adrienne Furness (2008):

1. Talk to homeschoolers who visit the library. Find out what the homeschoolers in the area are looking for. Remember, not all homeschoolers are the same.
2. Make sure people can find homeschooling materials—they can’t check out what they can’t find. Make a special section for homeschooling materials. Spine labels or pathfinders can make resources more visible.
3. Learn what homeschooling groups are active in the community, what their missions are, and who is running them. Tap into existing networks using word-of-mouth interaction. Remember that homeschoolers can be ultra-sensitive about privacy issues.
4. Allow and encourage homeschoolers to use library meeting room space. This gets the homeschoolers into your library and provides the opportunity to market library resources and services.
5. Display projects created by homeschooled children and teens.
6. Create handouts of the state laws and regulations pertaining to homeschoolers.
7. Maintain a file of catalogs from companies that sell materials and supplies of interest to homeschoolers. Items can be stored in boxes and either circulated or made available as reference materials.
8. Extend any privileges made for to public and private school teachers (extended loan, no overdue fines, increased limits, etc.) to homeschoolers. Homeschooling parents are teachers.
9. Consider the needs of homeschoolers when creating library policies such as meeting rooms, loan periods, item limits, interlibrary loan fees, overdue fines/maximum fines, and volunteer programs.
10. Attend local homeschooling conferences, lectures, and curriculum fairs. Talk to homeschoolers to find out what they are talking about. Look at potential acquisitions for your collection. Attend annual state homeschooling conference (p.93-95).

Also, Furness notes that you may see homeschooled children, e.g. school aged children, in the library during school hours. Furness cautions that not all school ages children in the library during these hours are necessarily homeschooled, but you may try asking a few gentle questions if approached by parents with a reference question. Examples provided by Furness include, asking the purpose for seeking out the resource and asking if it’s to be used for educational or recreational use. If the parent does indentify him or herself as a homeschooler, you might divulge to them that the library has been searching for new ways to serve homeschoolers, ask for tips, or even ask general questions about why they choose to homeschool, what method of homeschooling they use, and other general interest questions (Furness, p. 56). It is important to maintain a friendly and genuinely curious demeanor, so as not to antagonize or alarm the parents.

Even if you are unable to connect with homeschoolers personally, it may still be possible to start building up a homeschool collection. Furness includes a list of 14 popular curricular resources for homeschoolers. Such resources might be ordered by the library as part of the overall collection, or even as part of a non-circulating reference collection. Even if the library is not open to ordering such materials for the collection, knowing of these resources, librarians can direct patrons to the websites or even generate and print lists for homeschooling patrons. Here are the resources listed by Furness, including the updated URLs:

Furness’ List of Curricular Resources

All of these curricular resources have online catalogs and order forms. Alpha Omega and BJU even offer entirely online education options. While many of these curricular resources are Christian-based, a few sites, including Calvert, Chinaberry, Educators Publishing Services, Scholastic, and Lakeshore, are not specifically religious and do not cater to any particular religion or denomination. In addition, several of these sites may be more appropriate for the eclectic and/or unschooler, including Beautiful Feet Books, Chinaberry, Lakeshore, and Scholastic. None of these four sites offer actual curriculums. Beautiful Feet Books is a literature-based program that emphasizes learning history through literature. Chinaberry is a family-friendly educational resources site that offers materials, games, toys and more for a wide range of age groups. Lakeshore is very similar to Chinaberry but with a religious angle and an age limit of 6th grade. Scholastic is an actual publishing company that offers a lot of supplemental resources, although workbooks are also available. A couple of sites that might be of particular interest to homeschoolers looking for a more structured or test-based curriculum are BJU and Calvert. BJU goes so far as to incorporate standardized tests into their very structured curriculum. Calvert is published and distributed by an educational institution and follows the structure of that institution.

A few of these companies offer free, online placement tests. Specifically, Alpha Omega, Calvert, and Sonlight. Although, Sonlight requires that interested parents e-mail request for both placements tests and sample lessons. A Beka and the Educators Publishing Services both offer sample lessons online. In addition, several of these sites include resources for locating homeschool groups. The listings are limited and mostly consist of high profile groups, but Alpha Omega, Calvert, and Educators Publishing Services can all help new homeschoolers connect with homeschooling support groups.

Lerch and Welch list a few additional curriculum sources:

Another resource for homeschooling information and curricular idea are magazines. Many libraries have started subscribing to one or more of these titles in order to show support and provide resources to local homeschooling families. Furness has also compiled a list of homeschooling magazines that she believes will be most likely to stay in print over time. Here is the list of all those magazines still in print since the publication of Furness’ list:

Furness’ List of Homeschool Magazines

All of these magazines offer an online version, and Life Learning Magazine is an entirely online publication. Most of the sites also provide online samples. Sometimes you can sample an entire issue online; sometimes only select articles are available for browsing. Other interesting features to note: Life Learning Magazine caters to unschoolers, the Home School Digest website has numerous resource links, including links to curricular resources, and the Practical Homeschooling website includes an open forum for homeschoolers.

Lerch Welch also lists additional magazines that are still in print. Some of them are not specific to homeschoolers, but rather to families or people with particular life-styles, but here are a few that do target homeschoolers:

In addition to the above mentioned texts, David C. Brostrom’s A Guide To Homeschooling for Librarians may be a useful resource as well, listing fifty-six different curriculum resources, plus additional DVD, audio, software, and online resources. Some of these are out of date resources and are no longer available, given that the book was published in 1995, and many overlap with the above resources, but as a comprehensive listing with a few additional treasures, the book might be helpful.

Testing Resources
In addition to curriculum and supplementary resources, homeschoolers that continue on into their child’s high school years, are liable to want college prep materials (Lerch and Welch, p. 56). This may include something as simple as ACT and/or SAT test preps. Both of these entrance tests have websites with a page dedicated to practice and preparation resources. Your library may have even already purchased test prep books from these companies:

Another possible option is test prep courses that mimic the home-based curriculum approach homeschoolers may already be using. Most of the top test prep services have an online option, supplemented by workbooks, quizzes, and sample tests. Here are just a few name brands:

Since some colleges and universities require a high school diploma or GED, homeschoolers may be interested in GED prep materials before they ever show an interest in ACT or SAT prep. Many adult education centers offer GED preparation courses, but homeschoolers might want an at home alternative such as http://www.gedonline.org/.

In addition though, some homeschoolers, especially unschoolers, may want to know about open-admission schools and other universities that cater to homeschoolers. The Homeschool Curriculum Support lists a number of schools that are “homeschool friendly” either because of open-admissions practices or other admissions policies. This site notes that a number of colleges will be willing to work with homeschoolers who do not wish to take standardized tests, accepting other forms of achievement records such as portfolios, personal essays, community college scores, and other application packet information.

Lerch and Welch notes that College Internet Connection also lists colleges that are exceptionally welcoming of homeschoolers. This website is maintained by Cafi and Terry Cohen, the authors of And What About College? a book that Lerch and Welch note as a frequently requested resource book by homeschoolers (p. 56).

HSLDA also has a college information page (www.hslda.org/docs/nche/Issues/C/College.asp) which lists preparation resources, plus general information guides and legal guides.

Fiction
There are many fictional books that feature homeschooled youth. These range from young children through high school, privileged youth of the 18th/19th century through contemporary times, and even everyday life through fantastical worlds of the imagination. There are too many to list them all here, so this is a list of well-known titles and some less known titles as well. [A few of these may be stretching the meaning of homeschooled youth to the edge of the traditional idea of homeschool.

Examples of Pre-K and Juvenile Chapter books:
  • Kandoo Kangaroo Hops into Homeschool by Susan Ratner
  • I Am Learning All the Time by Rain Perry Fordyce
  • The Year I Didn't Go To School by Giselle Potter
  • The Little White Horse by Elizabeth Gouge
  • ​Pippi Longstocking by Astrid Lindren
  • Ballet Shoes by Noel Streatfeild
  • The Borrowers by Mary Norton
  • Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
  • Maniac Magee by Jerry Spinelli
  • Operation Typhoon Shore by Joshua Mowll
  • The Boxcar Children by Gertrude Chandler Warner
  • Heidi by Johanna Spyri
  • The Littles by John Peterson and Roberta Carter Clark
  • How I Live Now by Meg Rosoff
  • ​I Am a Homeschooler by Julie Voetberg
  • Road to Coorain by Jill Ker Conway
  • Linnets and Valerians by Elizabeth Gouge

Selections for older kids and teens:
  • Homeschool Liberation League by Lucy Frank
  • Chicken Friend by Nicola Morgan
  • According to Kit by Eugenie Doyle
  • ​The Tide Knot by Helen Dunmore
  • Word Nerd by Susin Nielsen
  • The Golden Compass by Phillip Pullman
  • Surviving the Applewhites by Stephanie Tolan
  • Love, Stargirl Jerry Spinelli
  • Feed by M. T. Anderson
  • ​Brian's Hunt by Gary Paulsen
  • A Time To Fly Free by Stephanie S. Tolan



Programming

Programs for Homeschoolers
As a librarian, you may also wonder what sort of programs homeschoolers want or are likely to find beneficial. Furness, Lerch and Welch, and even Brostrom all mention ideas for programming, as does the National Home Education Network in some of the resources provided on their Librarians page. Many of these suggestions may be ones that the library already does, including library tours, technology and library skills courses, story telling programs, book discussion groups and book clubs, movie and/or gaming nights, and even less traditional programs such as bingo and classes on first aid, nutrition, and budgeting. One reoccurring issue that is broached by all of these texts though, is the issue of age cut-offs. The National Home Education Network notes that homeschoolers prefer “family-oriented programs and activities” as apposed to “grade-level or age-level based” because these families are accustomed to learning in a “multi-aged environment” (NHEN). Furness notes that some homeschooling families have children ranging from little kids through teenagers, and these families may want simultaneous or back-to-back programs for various age groups, so as to make the most out of their library outing (p. 71). Thus, homeschoolers pose a unique dilemma on the target audience front.

These authors also make suggestions for some programs that specifically target homeschoolers.
  • Curriculum Swaps: Furness notes that many homeschoolers may already engage in swaps organized by their groups or organizations, but may be enthusiastic about doing such an event at the library. These events serve as an easy way for homeschoolers to trade curriculum they are no longer using and gain information about curriculums used by other homeschoolers.
  • Displays: All four resources suggest creating displays either for homeschoolers or that feature work done by homeschoolers (books, art work, science projects, etc.).
  • Programs Traditionally Offered Only In Schools: these may include writing workshops, pen pal programs, job/career fairs, ACT/SAT programs, debates and spelling bees, or even a science fair. However, Furness also suggests a family math night and language workshops. Her suggestions for developing the math event include:
    • Pulling relevant books from the collection (everything from counting picture books to adult books on mathematical logic).
    • Setting up math related game stations throughout the library for families to visit and play at.
    • Including a family math trivia with multi-aged groups.
  • Language workshops could cover a foreign language, sign language, or another form of communication. Furness suggests hiring “an instructor at a community college or community center” to lead the language workshops (p. 121).
  • Homeschool Month: Brostrom mentioned an example at the Arlington Heights Public Library in Illinois, where the library declared April Homeschoolers Month and gave special tours to homeschoolers for the duration of that month (p. 15). Such a time frame could also be used for displays, books talks on books about or for homeschoolers, and other programs targeted to homeschoolers as well.
  • Back to Homeschool Party: This idea is described in more detail on the ALSC Blog in an article titled “Back to Homeschool Party” by Abby Johnson. The basic idea is to have the kids entertained in one room (with games, snacks, and other attractions), while the parents meet and discuss topics of interest or concern in another room. The parents are not prohibited from hanging out with the children, nor are the kids banned from the parents’ room. The event is basically designed as a fun get together for all involved.

Other Resources
Aside from programs many of these authors note that homeschoolers often look for other specific resources and opportunities, as well. The one most commonly mentioned by all of the above sources (plus others sources) is extended borrowing privileges, much like those afforded to school teachers. This is a policy issue, but probably an important one if you want to attract homeschoolers to your library. Other resources and opportunities mentioned:
  • Furness mentions that parents want the privilege of being able to sit in on any program their child might attend. Homeschooling parents often find that they are learning along with their children, and they value this experience so much that they wish to extend this privilege to the library setting (p. 75).
  • Lerch and Welch not that homeschooling teens particularly value volunteer and teen advisory board opportunities (p. 122). These teens may be especially useful for assisting with programs and activities for a variety of age-groups, not just those age-ranges in which they fall.
  • The National Home Education Network notes that homeschoolers may also wish to have ready access to state standards effecting them specifically, science equipment, and speakers that specifically address their concerns and needs, including “speakers on child development, learning theories, or lectures on specific academic subjects” and/or “talks by experienced homeschoolers on subjects related specifically to homeschooling” (www.nhen.org/librarians/what-homeschoolers-want.html).


Reference
Brostrom, David C. (1995). A Guide To Homeschooling for Librarians. Fort Atkinson, WI: Highsmith Press.

Furness, Adrienne. (2008). Helping Homeschoolers in the Library. New York, NY: American Library Association.

GED Online: GED Test Preparation Services. (2011). Retrieved at http://www.gedonline.org/.

Green, Christa L. and Kathleen V. Hoover-Dempsey. “Why Do Parents Homeschool? A Systematic Examination of Parental Involvement.” Education and Urban Society. 39.2 (2007): 264-285.

Home School Legal Defense Association. (2011). Homepage at http://www.hslda.org/.
–– Homeschooling Your Struggling Learner. Retrieved from HSLDA at www.hslda.org/strugglinglearner/.
–– Colleges and Universities. (2007) Retrieved from HSLDA at www.hslda.org/docs/nche/Issues/C/College.asp.

Homeschool.com
–– Homeschooling Resource Guide: Special Needs. (2011). Retrieved at www.homeschool.com/resources01/specialneeds.asp.
–– Frequently Asked Questions About Homeschooling. (2011). Retrieved at http://www.homeschool.com/new/faq.asp

Homeschool Friendly Colleges & Universities. (2011). “College” page on the Homeschool Curriculum Support website. Retrieved at http://www.homeschool-curriculum-and-support.com/colleges.html.

Johnson, Abby. (2011). Back to Homeschool Party. ALSC Blog available from http://www.alsc.ala.org/blog/.

Knapp, Julie Shepherd. (2006) Homeschool Diner.
–– Before You Begin—Know Your State or Provincial Homeschool Regulations and Your School District Policies! Retrieved at www.homeschooldiner.com/basics/getting_started/legalities.html.
–– What Is a Homeschool Curriculum? Do I Need to Buy It Right Away? Retrieved at www.homeschooldiner.com/basics/curriculum/do_i_need_curriculum.html
–– Special Needs Homeschooling. Retrieved at www.homeschooldiner.com/specials/special_needs/main.html.

Lerch, Maureen T. & Janet Welch. (2004). Serving Homeschooled Teens and Their Parents. Westport, CT: Libraries Unlimited.

Marquam, Tamara. “Fable and Fact: Serving the Homeschool Population in Public Libraries.” Indiana Libraries 27.1 (2008): 12-18. Library Literature and Information Science Full Text.

Miller, Christine (Webmaster). (2005). Classical Christian Homeschooling. Retrieved at classical-homeschooling.org/.

National Challenged Homeschoolers Association (NATHAN). (2011). Christian Families Homeschooling Special Needs Children. Retrieved at www.nathhan.com/.

National Homeschool Education Network. (2011).
–– Legal Information. Retrieved at http://www.nhen.org/legal/legal-information.html.
–– Librarians page. Retrieved at http://www.nhen.org/professionals/librarians.html.

Private and Home School Friendly Colleges & Universities. (2005). College Internet Connection. Retrieved at http://www.homeschoolfriendlycolleges.com/index.html.

Simply Charlotte Mason. (2011). Retrieved at simplycharlottemason.com/.

Traditions of Roman Catholic Homes (T.O.R.C.H.). (2011). Retrieved at www.torchhomeschooling.org/.

U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. (2009). Homeschooled Students. The Condition of Education 2009 (NCES 2009-081). Retrieved at www.nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/indicator_hsc.asp.

References
Brostrom, David C. (1995). A Guide To Homeschooling for Librarians. Fort Atkinson, WI: Highsmith Press.
Furness, Adrienne. (2008). Helping Homeschoolers in the Library. New York, NY: American Library Association.
GED Online: GED Test Preparation Services. (2011). Retrieved at http://www.gedonline.org/.
Home School Legal Defense Association. (2011). Homepage at http://www.hslda.org/.
Homeschooling Your Struggling Learner. Retrieved from HSLDA at www.hslda.org/strugglinglearner/.
– Colleges and Universities. (2007) Retrieved from HSLDA at www.hslda.org/docs/nche/Issues/C/College.asp.
Homeschool.com
Homeschooling Resource Guide: Special Needs. (2011). Retrieved at www.homeschool.com/resources01/specialneeds.asp.
– Frequently Asked Questions About Homeschooling. (2011). Retrieved at http://www.homeschool.com/new/faq.asp.
Homeschool Friendly Colleges & Universities. (2011). “College” page on the Homeschool Curriculum Support website. Retrieved at http://www.homeschool-curriculum-and-support.com/colleges.html.
Johnson, Abby. (2011). Back to Homeschool Party. ALSC Blog available from http://www.alsc.ala.org/blog/.
Knapp, Julie Shepherd. (2006) Homeschool Diner.
– Before You Begin—Know Your State or Provincial Homeschool Regulations and Your School District Policies! Retrieved at homeschooldiner.com/basics/getting_started/legalities.html.
– What Is a Homeschool Curriculum? Do I Need to Buy It Right Away? Retrieved at homeschooldiner.com/basics/curriculum/do_i_need_curriculum.html.
– Special Needs Homeschooling. Retrieved at homeschooldiner.com/specials/special_needs/main.html.
Lerch, Maureen T. & Janet Welch. (2004). Serving Homeschooled Teens and Their Parents. Westport, CT: Libraries Unlimited.
Miller, Christine (Webmaster). (2005). Classical Christian Homeschooling. Retrieved at classical-homeschooling.org/.
National Homeschool Education Network. (2011).
– Legal Information. Retrieved at http://www.nhen.org/legal/legal-information.html.
– Librarians page. Retrieved at http://www.nhen.org/professionals/librarians.html.
National Challenged Homeschoolers Association (NATHAN). (2011). Christian Families Homeschooling Special Needs Children. Retrieved at www.nathhan.com/.
Private and Home School Friendly Colleges & Universities. (2005). College Internet Connection. Retrieved at http://www.homeschoolfriendlycolleges.com/index.html.
Simply Charlotte Mason. (2011). Retrieved at simplycharlottemason.com/.
Traditions of Roman Catholic Homes (T.O.R.C.H.). (2011). Retrieved at www.torchhomeschooling.org/.
U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. (2009). Homeschooled Students. The Condition of Education 2009 (NCES 2009-081). Retrieved at www.nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/indicator_hsc.asp.